Routine Prenatal Tests

Routine Prenatal Tests


(gentle music) – At your first pre-natal
visit during your pregnancy your provider will order a number of routine pre-natal labs. The term pre-natal means prior to birth and refers to the time
period of your pregnancy. It’s helpful to know what you
will be screened for and why. These tests will require a blood sample, urine sample, and vaginal swab sample. Some testing may have already been done before you are pregnant during
a pre-conception appointment. Your provider will check your blood type and Rhesus type, or RH type,
which is a specific protein on red blood cells that has implications for the health of your baby. Your provider will make sure
you don’t have antibodies to other types of blood
that could potentially put your pregnancy at risk. Your provider will get
a starting evaluation of your blood level and platelet level. This helps ensure that you’re not anemic or have complications that could lead to dangerous bleeding during
your pregnancy or at delivery. You will be tested to
see if you are immune to German measles, also known as Rubella, and if you are immune to Chickenpox, also known as Varicella. If you are not immune to either of these, it will be especially
important to avoid infection during pregnancy and you can
get a vaccine after delivery to protect you in the future. All women in the U.S.
are screened for HIV, syphilis, hepatitis B,
chlamydia, and gonorrhea. Some providers add tuberculosis
screening to this panel. Women with risk factors
should also be screened for hepatitis C and Trichomonas vaginalis. For patients with other risk factors, Zika screening, toxoplasmosis screening, or herpes screening may also be offered. Your provider will check to see if you’re carrying any
bacteria in your urine. You may not have any symptoms,
but if you have any bacteria, you will need antibiotic treatment to prevent a potential kidney infection during your pregnancy. The American College of
Obstetrics and Gynecology recommends all women be tested to see if they are
cystic fibrosis carriers or spinal muscular atrophy carriers. If you are found to be a carrier, your partner should also undergo testing. Women who are at risk
of pre-existing diabetes will be tested at the
beginning of pregnancy and most women will then be tested for gestational diabetes between 24 and 28 weeks of gestation. Thyroid screening is not
recommend for all patients. If you have any risk factors or a history of thyroid disfunction, your provider will recommend screening. Your provider will offer you a non-invasive fetal
genetic screening test to determine if your pregnancy is high or low risk for Down syndrome or other genetic trisomy anomalies. This testing is optional
and you have the choice to meet with a genetic counselor to find out more about it. If you test positive, you
would then be given the option for invasive testing such as with chorionic villi sampling or amniocentesis to diagnose if your pregnancy is positive for genetic anomaly. At 35 to 36 weeks gestation, your provider will collect a vaginal swab to test for Group B Streptococcus. This type of bacteria can infect
your baby during delivery. If you are a carrier, you
will be given antibiotics during your labor. As always, we encourage
you to ask questions if you don’t understand
why a particular test is recommended by your provider. Your healthcare team is here for you working to ensure your pregnancy
is off to a healthy start. (light music)

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