Portraits in Nursing | Kaiser Permanente

Portraits in Nursing | Kaiser Permanente


[music] Nursing is something very
special to me. It means taking care of people. [baby crying] I’ve been doing this for
eight years, and there are so many times
where I still get teary-eyed hearing that first baby cry. It’s life, you know,
in your hands. And being able to experience
that almost on a daily basis, you can’t compare that. A lot of kids are apprehensive
about their vaccines, and so I try to calm them down
by just talking to them and before you know it,
I’m done. I see the work that I do is
helping children to be well. In pediatric oncology, children
come through on and off for treatment over a few years,
so we get to know the child and their family really well. The outcomes are
improving daily. In my time, I have seen the
success rate increase. Sometimes it can be really
devastating, but it’s such an honor to be
part of that family when they’re going through that journey
with their child. It’s an extreme privilege. [music] When you’re getting a patient
ready for surgery, there’s definitely a timeline,
but you still get to spend a decent amount of time at
their bedside. I enjoy taking care of
my patients. It brings me great pride to know
that people trust me, and they know that I’m going to
do everything I can to make sure that they’re safe and that they
have a good experience. I’m a CRNA, or certified
registered nurse anesthetist. We work in conjunction with a
physician to provide anesthesia services. I take patients to a point of
unconsciousness, monitor their vital signs,
keep them healthy and keep them pain free, so by
the time surgery’s over. they wake up comfortable
and happy. A lot of people will look at
what I do and think, wow, nurses do that? Yes we do! [music] The goal of what I do here is to
help promote people’s quality and quantity of life. Making sure that people get to
their doctor’s appointments, do their labs so that we can
track how well they’re doing, that they’re taking their
medications correctly. I love what I do. Having the opportunity to help
people who might otherwise not get this type of help and
being on a long journey with them over time is very,
very gratifying. I find being a hospice nurse
profoundly enlightening. My patients offer me so much,
and then I want to give to them in return. Every visit, I’m assessing if
their symptoms like pain or shortness of breath are
controlled or managed. I offer them instructions and
guidance and comfort, emotional support,
and they give me wisdom. I feel when I leave, okay,
you’ve done good. Today was a good day;
you did good. [music] I think what drew me to the ICU
was the adrenaline. We care for the sickest
patients. Your job is to move as fast as
you can to get them back to their optimal level as
quick as possible. I don’t call it work.
I call it helping people. I call it an opportunity to make
a difference. I really believe that. Here in acute rehab, we take
care of the spinal cord patients that just came out of surgery,
as well as someone with a traumatic brain injury
from a car accident, or just came from the emergency
room from having a stroke. Our goal is to assist the
patient and the family on being able to take care of themselves,
and hopefully discharge them to the community and be as
independent as possible. What we do here really makes a
difference in someone’s life. Med Surg nursing is very busy, but if a nurse can sit down,
hold a patient’s hand, talk to them,
it comforts them. It can relieve them of their
stress, their pain. It’s not just giving them
medications; it’s sharing a little bit of
myself with them. They might not remember my name, but I hope they remember how
I took care of them. [music]

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