Instructions for successful surgery and rehab at Emory Decatur Hospital’s Joint Solutions Center

Instructions for successful surgery and rehab at Emory Decatur Hospital’s Joint Solutions Center


Hello, I’m Karin for Emory Decatur hospital’s
award-winning Joint Solutions Center, where you’ll be having your joint replacement
surgery. We want you to have the best outcome possible
for your surgery and rehabilitation. So, I’m going to carefully explain how our
program works and do my best to help you prepare for your time both in and out of the hospital
after surgery. Thanks for taking the time to watch this video. You can be comfortable knowing that we’ll
assign a highly skilled and dedicated rehabilitation team to you. That includes a physical therapist to help
with movement and strength and an occupational therapist to get you back doing your daily
living tasks. This team has six major goals for you after
surgery and with their help, at the end of your stay with us, you should be able to:
Get in and out of bed independently, get on and off a chair and toilet safely by yourself,
walk up to 300 feet with your assistive device, be able to dress yourself with minimal assistance,
and be able to go up and down stairs or curbs properly and safely, and most importantly,
return to the comforts of your own home and back to a more active and healthy lifestyle
as safely and quickly as possible. The therapists and nursing staff will talk
to you about any specific precautions you need to be aware of with your joint replacement. You’ll also be getting a guide book that includes
a lot of the information I’m sharing, so get your questions ready for our team. We’re glad you selected us for your joint
replacement. Here’s a little bit more information about
us. The Joint Solutions Center is a specialized
program and staff within Emory Decatur Hospital on North Decatur Road. Our unit has 28 private patient rooms exclusive
to orthopedic total joint replacement patients. We offer unlimited visiting hours for your
friends and family, including accommodations if they wish to spend the night with you. We have free Wi-Fi service in every room too. All our patients dress comfortably in their
own clothes after surgery and the food is really good. We hope you’ll find the atmosphere more relaxing
than that of a typical hospital setting. Our staff loves what we do and we look forward
to serving you. While you are here, you will be involved in
multiple group therapy sessions that will build camaraderie and even some motivation
among your fellow joint replacement peers. Be on the lookout as we track your distances
walked on our Georgia Sightseers board. The best thing about our program, in most
cases you’re back to the comforts of your own home in less than three days time, and
many patients return to the sports and activities they love within two to three months. We take pride in our educational approach
and are here to answer any question or concern that you or your loved ones have. Now, let’s get you prepared for surgery. Try your best to make healthy choices in the
weeks and days leading up to your surgery. Eat a healthy diet and stay away from fast
and fried foods as much as possible. Healthy proteins, carbohydrates, and more
fruits and vegetables will help your body maintain proper glucose levels. Drink a lot of water and avoid sodas and extra
caffeine so that your body will be well hydrated before surgery. This will reduce side effects from anesthesia
and pain medications. Your physician, or pre-op testing nurses,
will talk to you about what medications you should continue taking or possibly stop taking
leading up to your special day. If you have any questions or doubts regarding
your medications be sure to call your surgeon’s office. We ask that you try to enlist a coach for
at least a week. Your coach should be someone you can rely on to stay with you as much as possible during your time in the hospital. Your coach is needed for general support guidance
and most of all, encouragement following your surgery. We want your coach to be an active participant
in your recovery process, from your physical therapy activities, to listening and asking
questions when doctors and nurses are talking with you. Everyone benefits from having a coach. Keep in mind you will also need to plan transportation
home from the hospital at discharge. Be sure to have your coach or family member
at the ready if possible. Having a few ready-to-eat meals available
to make those first few days home more comfortable for you. Remember this is a major surgery and you will
need help. Now is also the time to begin preparing your
home for your return from the hospital. A few simple things you can do now will make
your arrival easier. You will need extra room to navigate with
your walker through your home. Get someone to help you move furniture if
needed. Remove throw rugs that could be a tripping
hazard and be wary of small objects or even pets that could cause a fall. Consider adding a firm pillow to low sitting
areas and even preparing a main level sleeping room if one is available for the first week
or so. If you have to navigate stairs, ensure that
the handrails are securely fastened to the wall before surgery and use those when you
get home. Don’t forget about the bathroom either. Non-slip rubber backed mats near the shower
or tub are good, and a tub bench or shower chair will really help. Handheld shower heads and a long-handled sponge
will make bathing easier. The lower height of a standard toilet can
make getting off and on more difficult, so consider getting a commode chair with arm
handles to push up from, or an elevated toilet seat. Now is the time to think about whether you
need to make any adjustments to your home. As you get close to surgery day, and start
packing, we recommend that you pack 2 to 3 sets of loose-fitting comfortable clothes-shorts
are most ideal. Slip-on shoes with rubber non-slip soles are
a great idea and we’ll provide non-slip hospital socks as well. If you have important paperwork such as a
living will, remember to pack a copy of that as well for the registration department. Be sure to pack your incentive spirometer
which you’ll get during your pre-op testing day and you’ll be using frequently to help
prevent any fluid buildup in your lungs. Please bring a list of any medications you
routinely take so the hospital pharmacy can fill them if needed. If you have any special equipment such as
a CPAP machine, eye glasses etc., pack those too. If you already have a rolling walker have
it brought to your room sometime within the 1st or 2nd day so our therapy team can ensure
it’s appropriate for you. All patients will be using a walker while
here in the hospital and one will be ordered for you for home use if need be. Please leave large amounts of cash and jewelry
and your regular medications at home unless advised differently by your physician. We don’t want to take a chance that something
goes missing and you can be comfortable knowing that our pharmacy will fill any needed medications. Now, let’s move on to what you’ll need to
do just before your actual surgery. It’s really important to remember that you’re
not to eat or drink anything after midnight the night before your surgery. The only exception is a small sip of water
for any medications you’re instructed to take and refrain from smoking or tobacco use at
least 24 hours prior to the surgery. Since you may not fully bathe again until
your incision is completely healed, please take a thorough shower or bath before you
come to the hospital. The night before surgery it’s a good idea
to review your blue joint replacement guidebook, be sure everything is packed, try to relax,
and get a good night’s rest. On the day of your surgery, remember to bring
with you only the medication your surgeon or the nursing staff advised you to take. Arrive at the registration desk in the Dr.
Bobbie Bailey Surgery Center two hours prior to your scheduled surgery time. This is the same place you went during your
pre-op testing and registration. Your family or friends will be escorted to
the surgical waiting room as you’re taken back to the surgical prep area. Surgery itself will last about 60 to 90 minutes,
but the entire procedure is closer to three to four hours, including recovery time. Once you’ve transferred from the O.R., you’ll
spend one to two hours being monitored in our PACU recovery unit. From there you’ll be handed over to our 2200
unit, home of the Joint Solutions Center. You’ll get a nurse assessment, an IV for pain,
and soon start on a liquid diet. You may be temporarily using low level oxygen
through a nasal cannula as well as a catheter to help drain your bladder. While you’re in your bed, we will place pneumatic
foot pumps on your feet to improve lower extremity blood flow and avoid blood clots. Some patients may have a drain from
the incision. After surgery you’ll be encouraged to get up and move around a lot and participate in various therapies. On the first new day after surgery, the 5:00
a.m. wake-up will come early so you can get any blood work done, that informs the doctor’s
visit with you a bit later in the morning. We’ll get you cleaned up, changed and into
your recliner by 7:00 a.m. You’ll have a one-on-one therapy session in
your room with your assigned physical therapist which usually includes some walking. A nice lunch will be followed by your first
group therapy session at 1:00 p.m. It’s hard to believe you’ll be up performing
some basic strengthening exercises for your road to recovery, but you will. Your occupational therapist will then work
with you on tasks, like dressing, bathing, getting on and off of chairs, and out of the
car etc. Your coach is encouraged to be involved just
as much as you are during those sessions. Later, you may be asked to try a little more
walking with our therapy staff or you’ll have some relaxation time before 4:30 p.m. dinner. Rest assured that our staff will be checking
on you and monitoring you hourly throughout the day and your entire stay here. Early mobility is key to the success of your
surgery and of course we will ensure that you’re safe as you move about. If you are a total knee replacement patient,
you will have a continuous passive motion or CPM device placed on your leg while in
the recovery unit. It will slowly move your foot back and forth
to start early range of motion with your knee. You will use this device four to six hours
a day while in your bed at the hospital. All of our beds are equipped with a hand trapeze
to make that easier. The majority of your time here will be spent
in your orthopaedic recliner sitting upright or in a slightly reclined position to avoid
fluid buildup in your lungs. If possible, we also want you to eat all of
your meals in the chair. Most hip replacement patients will use a foam
hip abduction pillow between your legs while in bed for safety. We don’t want your legs to get into certain
positions while you sleep in case of dislocation or injury to your new surgically repaired
hip. In your room, there will be two cold packs for pain and swelling that you can also take home with you. Your nursing staff will continue to monitor
you and check in every hour on that first day. Each time we enter the room, we’ll be checking
on the four P’s. Pain, potty, position and possessions. We’ll be addressing any restroom needs, making
you comfortable in your chair or bed, and ensuring you have anything you may need within
reach. You should expect some level of pain or discomfort
from this major surgery. Normal side effects of the anesthesia and
medications can be nausea, lightheadedness, or constipation. Please remember, it’s up to you to let the
nurses know how you feel and ask for pain medication when you need it. You’ll rate your pain on a scale from zero
to ten with ten being the worst. Don’t let your pain get too severe before
requesting medication. It’s much easier to manage lower levels of
pain than to try and bring down severe pain. If you should require an additional stay,
your post-op day two includes much of the same routine as day one but you will have
an earlier group therapy session at 9 a.m. You may have time for independent therapy
before a specially prepared lunch for you and your coach. During your therapy time, you’ll be getting
discharge instructions covering physical things like changing your dressing and preventing
any possible complications. After that you’ll have one more group physical
therapy session and from there most patients can expect to be discharged from the hospital
mid to late afternoon on that post-op day two. Due to the nature of the surgery we do want
to mention the rare but possible complications. Your active participation in preventive measures
can address most of them. One is blood clots, which can be prevented
by regular walking and use of your compression device and foot pumps. A second possible complication is fluid buildup
in the lungs, so take ten big inhalations on your incentive spirometer every hour that
you’re awake to keep your lungs good and clear. Lower extremity swelling is typical
following your surgery and ice packs as well as anti-inflammatory medication will help. The tools to prevent the fourth possible complication,
infection, include hand sanitizing, protective barriers, frequent dressing checks and certain
medications. We ask that you and your visitors also participate
in active infection prevention. During discharge planning, we’ll work hard
as a collaborative team to make sure you have everything you may need to be ready to go
home. Our rehab and nursing team, along with your
surgeon, will ensure that you’re safe to return home. The Joint Solutions Center has a case manager
assigned to each of our patients. He or she will help coordinate any special
assistance that’s needed once you’re home. Before you leave, make sure you have any special
equipment such as your walker or bedside commode. Most of our physicians order physical therapy
after discharge to continue your recovery, which will be coordinated by your case manager. Typically a therapist comes to your home two
to three times a week for two weeks. After a follow-up visit, your surgeon may
add outpatient physical therapy for you to work on more advanced strengthening, range
of motion, and mobility. Some patients may need temporary inpatient
rehab or a skilled nursing facility stay. In the unlikely event you’re not ready or
able to return home, again, our case manager will help coordinate that transition. The Joint Solutions Center will always function
as a complete team to aid in a safe and speedy recovery following your joint replacement. Emory Decatur hospital sincerely appreciates
your choice of the Joint Solutions Center for your total joint replacement needs. If there’s anything that the staff can do
to enhance or improve your time here, please do not hesitate to ask. Again, thank you for choosing us and congratulations
on taking your first steps to a newer, healthier you. If you have any questions, please call our joint care program manager at four zero four five zero one five six nine seven.

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